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Using Your New Vision Benefits in 2020!

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A new year means new benefits! Remember that you can use your re-upped 2020 benefits on any goods and services in our offices. If you’re due for your annual eye exam or need new glasses or contacts, the New Year is a perfect time to take advantage of your benefits before the year gets away from you. And if you have questions regarding your benefits, our verification team is here to help!

Book Your Family’s Eye Exams While You’re Home Together for the Holidays!

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The end of the year is a great time to schedule your family for their annual eye exams while everyone if off of school/work! Remember that if you schedule 3 or more exams together, we’ll also take

$50 off of a complete pair of glasses for each of you!

And if you have an FSA, remember to use your benefits before the end of the year!

Use Your FSA Benefits Before the End of the Year!

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Did you know that your FSA dollars disappear at the end of the year if you don’t use them? Check out the video below for info on how FSA’s work and how to take advantage of your end of year benefits for all of your vision care needs.

 

Get Ready for Some Spooky Savings in October!

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There’s no better way to get ready for Fall than by updating your look with some fresh frame choices! Purchase any pair of complete glasses between now and 10/31 and we’ll take 50% off of your second pair!

*select styles only, one offer per patient

September is Healthy Aging Month!

Vision changes occur as you get older, but these changes don’t have to affect your lifestyle. Knowing what to expect and when to seek professional care can help you safeguard your vision.

As you reach your 60s and beyond, you need to be aware of the warning signs of age-related eye health problems that could cause vision loss. Many eye diseases have no early symptoms. They may develop painlessly, and you may not notice the changes to your vision until the condition is quite advanced. Wise lifestyle choices, regular eye exams and early detection of disease can significantly improve your chances of maintaining good eye health and vision as you age.

In the years after you turn 60, a number of eye diseases may develop that can change your vision permanently. The earlier these problems are detected and treated, the more likely you can retain good vision.The following are some vision disorders to be aware of:

  • Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) is an eye disease that affects the macula (the center of the light-sensitive retina at the back of the eye) and causes central vision loss. Although small, the macula is the part of the retina that allows us to see fine detail and colors. Activities like reading, driving, watching TV and recognizing faces all require good central vision provided by the macula. While macular degeneration decreases central vision, peripheral or side vision remains unaffected.
  • Cataracts are cloudy or opaque areas in the normally clear lens of the eye. Depending upon their size and location, they can interfere with normal vision. Usually cataracts develop in both eyes, but one may be worse than the other. Cataracts can cause blurry vision, decreased contrast sensitivity, decreased ability to see under low light level conditions (such as when driving at night), dulling of colors and increased sensitivity to glare.
  • Diabetic retinopathy is a condition that occurs in people with diabetes. It is the result of progressive damage to the tiny blood vessels that nourish the retina. These damaged blood vessels leak blood and other fluids that cause retinal tissue to swell and cloud vision. The condition usually affects both eyes. The longer a person has diabetes, the greater the risk for developing diabetic retinopathy. In addition, the instability of a person’s glucose measurements over time can impact the development and/or severity of the condition. At its most severe, diabetic retinopathy can cause blindness.
  • Dry eye is a condition in which a person produces too few or poor-quality tears. Tears maintain the health of the front surface of the eye and provide clear vision. Dry eye is a common and often chronic problem, particularly in older adults.
  • Glaucoma is a group of eye diseases characterized by damage to the optic nerve resulting in loss of peripheral (side) vision. It often affects both eyes, typically one eye before the other. If left untreated, glaucoma can lead to total blindness. People with a family history of glaucoma, African Americans and older adults have a higher risk of developing the disease. Glaucoma is often painless and can have no obvious symptoms until there is a significant loss of side vision.
  • Retinal detachment is a tearing or separation of the retina from the underlying tissue. Retinal detachment most often occurs spontaneously due to changes to the gel-like vitreous fluid that fills the back of the eye. Other causes include trauma to the eye or head, health problems like advanced diabetes, and inflammatory eye disorders. If not treated promptly, it can cause permanent vision loss.

You may not realize that health problems affecting other parts of your body can affect your vision as well. People with diabetes or hypertension (high blood pressure), or who are taking medications that have eye-related side effects, are at greatest risk for developing vision problems. Regular eye exams are even more important as you reach your senior years. The American Optometric Association recommends annual eye examinations for everyone over age 60. Schedule your exam immediately if you notice any changes in your vision.

Children’s Vision Health and the Importance of Back to School Eye Exams

According to experts, 80% of learning is visual, which means that if your child is having difficulty seeing clearly, his or her learning can be affected. This also goes for infants who develop and learn about the world around them through their sense of sight. To ensure that your children have the visual resources they need to grow and develop normally, their eyes and vision should be checked by an eye doctor at certain stages of their development.

Children with uncorrected vision conditions or eye health problems face many barriers in life, academically, socially and athletically. High-quality eye care can break down these barriers and help enable your children to reach their highest potential.

Vision doesn’t just happen. A child’s brain learns how to use eyes to see, just like it learns how to use legs to walk or a mouth to form words. The longer a vision problem goes undiagnosed and untreated, the more a child’s brain learns to accommodate the vision problem.

That is why a comprehensive eye examination is so important for children. Early detection and treatment provide the very best opportunity to correct vision problems so your child can learn to see clearly. Make sure your child has the best possible tools to learn successfully.

Check out the video below for some important facts on children’s eye health and don’t forget to book your back to school eye exams today before Summer gets away from you.

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